The Pirbright Institute receives strategic funding from BBSRC

To view or apply for current job vacancies please see below.

If you have any questions about recruitment at The Pirbright Institute, please email our Recruitment team: pirbright.hr@pirbright.ac.uk

Jobs


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Post RefJob TitleDetailsPDF FileClosing Date
16P-10Postdoctoral Research ScientistThe purpose of this position is to recruit a Postdoctoral Research Scientist within the Avian Influenza Research group at The Pirbright Institute, to carry out investigations to gain insight into the viral factors that contribute to H7N9 virus maintenance in poultry and transmission to humans. This 3-year research project is fully funded by the BBSRC grant - http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk/projects?ref=BB/N002571/1). The researcher will exploit advanced molecular virology techniques to systematically dissect viral genetic components that directly impact on H7N9 virus tissue tropism, pathogenesis, and transmission in avian and mammalian species. In particular, the researcher will investigate: (i) how does the changes in the internal genes influence the virological properties of H7N9 influenza virus?; (ii) how do internal gene cassettes from diversified clades of H9N2 viruses impact on H7N9 virus pathogenesis and transmission in avian and mammalian species?; and (iii) how do the H7N9 viruses transmits from poultry to humans?. The outcome of this research will inform potential risks posed by rapid genetic evolution of H7N9 by acquiring internal genes from circulating H9N2 viruses. The results will be utilised to design and develop improved tailor-made tools for prevention and control of these viruses in poultry and humans.PDF10-03-2016
16P-06Senior Laboratory TechnicianThe post holder will support the day to day activities of the Non-Vesicular Reference Laboratories at the Pirbright Institute. The primary purpose of NVRL is to provide a diagnostic service and characterise outbreaks of certain viral diseases that have a strong predisposition for trans-boundary spread. The post holder will assist the technical managers of the NVRL to ensure delivery of reference laboratory contracts (EU, DEFRA and OIE), this will involve molecular and serological testing of samples submitted for diagnosis. The post holder will assist with the characterisation of new and existing viral isolates, preparation of validation data for new or improved diagnostic tests, preparation of standard reagents and the review/writing of quality documents. PDF01-03-2016
16P-03Part-Time Postdoctoral Research ScientistA part-time post-doctoral Research Scientist with experience in virus quantitation and molecular diagnostic techniques in infected materials of birds infected with avian viruses is in the Avian Oncogenic virus group, as part of a BBSRC-NIH-funded EEID project, “Evolution of virulence of Marek’s disease virus, a collaborative project with the Evolutionary Biology group at Pennsylvania State University. In addition to helping and training other scientists on the project, the post-holder will also help in running the Poultry Users Committee at Pirbright, running the Poultry Health Course with the University of Nottingham, and the Poultry Disease group.PDF01-03-2016
16P-07Laboratory Technician Virus Characterisation Scientist 16P-07The post holder will be 60% funded on a European Grant (EVAg) and 40% from the non-vesicular reference laboratories (NVRL) and will be required to work on many of the viruses studied at the institute. The purpose of the EVAg project will be to isolate, passage and titer a number of different viruses working within strict health and safety and biosecurity regulations and adhering to quality standards. These will then require further testing for extraneous agents and some may require genomic sequencing. The post holder will physically store the viruses and he/she will add the virus provenance and test information to the Institutes and EVAg databases. For the remainder of his/her time they will be involved in the day to day testing that is submitted to the NVRL.PDF29-02-2016
16P-84Mosquito Research TechnicianThis position is funded through a Wellcome Trust Investigator Award to Prof Alphey, entitled “Developing methods for driving beneficial genetic traits into vector populations”. Insect synthetic biologists are beginning to develop the technical ability to manipulate wild populations by introgressing into them synthetic genes and traits (gene introgression refers to the introduction and perhaps spread of a gene into a target population). There are a wide range of potentially interesting candidate traits for such an approach, including reduced-vector-competence (reduced ability to transmit a pathogen, for example dengue or chikungunya viruses), or reduced-fitness (leading to suppression or elimination of the target population). Most media attention has focused on nuclease-based systems (CRISPR/Cas9, based on earlier work using homing endonucleases). These are artificial selfish DNA systems; the most widely discussed have extremely strong self-propagating ability which will tend to mean that they will spread relentlessly through an entire species or species complex. While this may be desirable in some instances, there are perhaps many more instances when we wish to treat one population of a pest but not the entire species. In principle, designs based on underdominance can achieve this (see Alphey, Ann Rev Entomol 2014 59:205-224 for more on gene drive), though none has yet been developed in a pest insect. We aim to extend the current state of the art by engineering underdominance-based gene drive systems, taking a synthetic biology approach. Several related designs share various components and will be developed in parallel, including one- and two-locus underdominant systems and also self-limiting “Killer-Rescue” systems. This is an iterative approach guided by mathematical models; conversely the models will be continuously refined by incorporating empirical data as it becomes available. The model organism will be the mosquito Aedes aegypti, the primary vector of dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever viruses. As well as being extremely important from a public health perspective this is a relatively robust and easily manipulated mosquito with which we have extensive experience of both laboratory work and field trials. PDF29-02-2016
16P-83Graduate Research Scientist This position is funded through a Wellcome Trust Investigator Award to Prof Alphey, entitled “Developing methods for driving beneficial genetic traits into vector populations”. Insect synthetic biologists are beginning to develop the technical ability to manipulate wild populations by introgressing into them synthetic genes and traits (gene introgression refers to the introduction and perhaps spread of a gene into a target population). There are a wide range of potentially interesting candidate traits for such an approach, including reduced-vector-competence (reduced ability to transmit a pathogen, for example dengue or chikungunya viruses), or reduced-fitness (leading to suppression or elimination of the target population). Most media attention has focused on nuclease-based systems (CRISPR/Cas9, based on earlier work using homing endonucleases). These are artificial selfish DNA systems; the most widely discussed have extremely strong self-propagating ability which will tend to mean that they will spread relentlessly through an entire species or species complex. While this may be desirable in some instances, there are perhaps many more instances when we wish to treat one population of a pest but not the entire species. In principle, designs based on underdominance can achieve this (see Alphey, Ann Rev Entomol 2014 59:205-224 for more on gene drive), though none has yet been developed in a pest insect. We aim to extend the current state of the art by engineering underdominance-based gene drive systems, taking a synthetic biology approach. Several related designs share various components and will be developed in parallel, including one- and two-locus underdominant systems and also self-limiting “Killer-Rescue” systems. This is an iterative approach guided by mathematical models; conversely the models will be continuously refined by incorporating empirical data as it becomes available. The model organism will be the mosquito Aedes aegypti, the primary vector of dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever viruses. As well as being extremely important from a public health perspective this is a relatively robust and easily manipulated mosquito with which we have extensive experience of both laboratory work and field trials. PDF29-02-2016
16P-82APost-doctoral Research Scientist This position is funded through a Wellcome Trust Investigator Award to Prof Alphey, entitled “Developing methods for driving beneficial genetic traits into vector populations”. Insect synthetic biologists are beginning to develop the technical ability to manipulate wild populations by introgressing into them synthetic genes and traits (gene introgression refers to the introduction and perhaps spread of a gene into a target population). There are a wide range of potentially interesting candidate traits for such an approach, including reduced-vector-competence (reduced ability to transmit a pathogen, for example dengue or chikungunya viruses), or reduced-fitness (leading to suppression or elimination of the target population). Most media attention has focused on nuclease-based systems (CRISPR/Cas9, based on earlier work using homing endonucleases). These are artificial selfish DNA systems; the most widely discussed have extremely strong self-propagating ability which will tend to mean that they will spread relentlessly through an entire species or species complex. While this may be desirable in some instances, there are perhaps many more instances when we wish to treat one population of a pest but not the entire species. In principle, designs based on underdominance can achieve this (see Alphey, Ann Rev Entomol 2014 59:205-224 for more on gene drive), though none has yet been developed in a pest insect. We aim to extend the current state of the art by engineering underdominance-based gene drive systems, taking a synthetic biology approach. Several related designs share various components and will be developed in parallel, including one- and two-locus underdominant systems and also self-limiting “Killer-Rescue” systems. This is an iterative approach guided by mathematical models; conversely the models will be continuously refined by incorporating empirical data as it becomes available. The model organism will be the mosquito Aedes aegypti, the primary vector of dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever viruses. As well as being extremely important from a public health perspective this is a relatively robust and easily manipulated mosquito with which we have extensive experience of both laboratory work and field trials. PDF25-02-2016
15P-80Cell Culture Technician (Maternity Cover)The Central Services Department provides scientific support across The Pirbright Institute. Services include laundry, cleaning, media preparation, glassware wash and sterilisation, and cell line production and maintenance. The CSU Cell Culture team supplies a variety of cell lines to world reference labs and for research projects. This supports over 100 scientists and maintains ISO 17025 UKAS accreditation. The successful candidate will supervise the cell culture section, managing the supply of primary and secondary cell lines to customers within the Institute, maintaining quality, and safety standards at all times.PDF24-02-2016
16P-82BPostdoctoral Research Scientist (Mathematical Modelling)This position is one of five funded through a Wellcome Trust Investigator Award to Prof Alphey, entitled “Developing methods for driving beneficial genetic traits into vector populations”. Insect synthetic biologists are beginning to develop the technical ability to manipulate wild populations by introgressing into them synthetic genes and traits (gene introgression refers to the introduction and perhaps spread of a gene into a target population). There are a wide range of potentially interesting candidate traits for such an approach, including reduced-vector-competence (reduced ability to transmit a pathogen, for example dengue or chikungunya viruses), or reduced-fitness (leading to suppression or elimination of the target population). Most media attention has focused on nuclease-based systems (CRISPR/Cas9, based on earlier work using homing endonucleases). These are artificial selfish DNA systems; the most widely discussed have extremely strong self-propagating ability which will tend to mean that they will spread relentlessly through an entire species or species complex. While this may be desirable in some instances, there are perhaps many more instances when we wish to treat one population of a pest but not the entire species. In principle, designs based on underdominance can achieve this (see Alphey, Ann Rev Entomol 2014 59:205-224 for more on gene drive), though none has yet been developed in a pest insect. We aim to extend the current state of the art by engineering underdominance-based gene drive systems, taking a synthetic biology approach. The model organism will be the mosquito Aedes aegypti, the primary vector of dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever viruses. As well as being extremely important from a public health perspective this is a relatively robust and easily manipulated mosquito with which we have extensive experience of both laboratory work and field trials. Several related designs share various components and will be developed in parallel, including one- and two-locus underdominant systems and also self-limiting “Killer-Rescue” systems. This is an iterative approach guided by mathematical models; conversely the models will be continuously refined by incorporating empirical data as it becomes available. The post-holder will be responsible for the mathematical modelling component of the project, with the other four funded positions focusing on development and testing of transgenic strains. Building on the existing literature, this will involve analysis of the theoretical potential and properties of each design. Issues of particular interest include: invasion thresholds under different release and ecological assumptions, stability to immigration and mutation, and, through sensitivity analysis, the effect of fitness costs and other parameters on these aspects. PDF24-02-2016
15P-73Postdoctoral Research Assistant (Picornavirus Molecular Biology)This position is for a Postdoctoral Research Assistant to work on a MRC funded research project “Picornavirus capsid protein VP4: Essential role in cell entry and conserved antiviral target”. The picornaviruses are a family of viruses which includes human pathogens such as poliovirus (PV) and human rhinovirus (HRV) and the livestock pathogen foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). The picornavirus capsid protein VP4 is essential for entry into the host cell. VP4 is involved in membrane penetration, a process which is not well understood but which has potential as a target for preventing infection. The project will use virology, recombinant proteins, model membranes, biophysics and structural biology to provide a comprehensive understanding of VP4 structure & function during the infection process and will provide proof-of-principle for VP4 as an antiviral target for the future control of multiple human diseases caused by viruses of the picornavirus family. PDF23-02-2016
16P-81Senior Postdoctoral Research Scientist This position is funded through a Wellcome Trust Investigator Award to Prof Alphey, entitled “Developing methods for driving beneficial genetic traits into vector populations”. Insect synthetic biologists are beginning to develop the technical ability to manipulate wild populations by introgressing into them synthetic genes and traits (gene introgression refers to the introduction and perhaps spread of a gene into a target population). There are a wide range of potentially interesting candidate traits for such an approach, including reduced-vector-competence (reduced ability to transmit a pathogen, for example dengue or chikungunya viruses), or reduced-fitness (leading to suppression or elimination of the target population). Most media attention has focused on nuclease-based systems (CRISPR/Cas9, based on earlier work using homing endonucleases). These are artificial selfish DNA systems; the most widely discussed have extremely strong self-propagating ability which will tend to mean that they will spread relentlessly through an entire species or species complex. While this may be desirable in some instances, there are perhaps many more instances when we wish to treat one population of a pest but not the entire species. In principle, designs based on underdominance can achieve this (see Alphey, Ann Rev Entomol 2014 59:205-224 for more on gene drive), though none has yet been developed in a pest insect. We aim to extend the current state of the art by engineering underdominance-based gene drive systems, taking a synthetic biology approach. Several related designs share various components and will be developed in parallel, including one- and two-locus underdominant systems and also self-limiting “Killer-Rescue” systems. This is an iterative approach guided by mathematical models; conversely the models will be continuously refined by incorporating empirical data as it becomes available. The model organism will be the mosquito Aedes aegypti, the primary vector of dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever viruses. As well as being extremely important from a public health perspective this is a relatively robust and easily manipulated mosquito with which we have extensive experience of both laboratory work and field trials. PDF20-02-2016
15P-78Postdoctoral Research ScientistInfectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is an avian coronavirus that causes large economic losses to the UK and global poultry industries. There is limited understanding of several molecular aspects of the IBV replication cycle. However, this understanding would provide increased ability for the future development of both improved IBV vaccines and also anti-viral treatments that could be applied to related coronaviruses. During replication, all coronaviruses induce rearrangement of cellular membranes generating replication-transcription complexes or replication organelles. These membranes are thought to provide a platform for assembly of the large multi-component viral RNA synthesis machinery and prevent detection of nascent viral transcripts of cellular detection. Although coronavirus induced membrane rearrangements have been characterised, the precise location of viral RNA synthesis remains to be elucidated. All coronaviruses to date have been found to induce the formation of double membrane vesicles in the cytoplasm of infected cells. In our recent work, we demonstrated that, unique from other coronaviruses, IBV also induces formation of double membrane spherules, or invaginations on modified ER, that create an ideal potential site for viral RNA synthesis. The project is aimed at gaining fundamental understanding of the mechanism of and virus-host cell interactions required for infectious bronchitis virus induced rearrangement of cellular membranes using a variety of virology, bioimaging, cell biology and protein interaction techniques. Further work will investigate the function of different virus induced membrane structures during the virus life cycle, including identification of the location of viral RNA synthesis.PDF16-02-2016
15P-68Network Security AnalystThe role of the Network Security Analyst is very important to the secure running of the Institute’s IT infrastructure, ensuring that emerging risks are analysed and mitigated in a timely manner. The role covers areas such as: • Ensuring that operational processes follow industry best practices such as ITIL and ISO/IEC 27001 • The operation of an Identity and Access Management model, covering aspects of user provisioning and privilege based access control • Event Management, including monitoring and log analysis • Key management and cryptography implementation • Defining and enforcing corporate security policy Above all, maintaining the protection of the Institute’s information resources. PDF16-02-2016
15P-77Research Assistant (Genetics and Genomics)The Pirbright Institute is a world leader in research on infectious diseases of livestock with a strong track record in translating this research into more effective disease control. This Research Scientist position is available within the Genetics and Genomics group led by the Dr Mark Fife. This group studies the impact of genetic variation on the avian immune responses to viral infection, and the genetic basis of vector borne diseases. The overall aim of the Group is to exploit natural genetic variation in chickens to disease resistance. Advances in sequencing technology and analysis now provide the opportunity decipher genetic variation at the level of the genome, to individual gene complexes through to the entire transcriptome at high resolution. We are exploiting these methods to characterise the restriction of avian viruses by the host innate immune system. PDF16-02-2016

Further particulars on the Fellowships and how to apply can be found here.

Fellowships


No Fellowships are available.